A History of the Roman Empire from its Foundation to the by J.B. Bury

By J.B. Bury

The booklet has no illustrations or index. it will probably have quite a few typos or lacking textual content. notwithstanding, dealers can obtain a loose scanned reproduction of the unique infrequent publication from the publisher's web site (GeneralBooksClub.com). you may also preview excerpts of the e-book there. dealers also are entitled to a unfastened trial club within the basic Books membership the place they could choose between greater than 1000000 books for free of charge. unique writer: ny Harper; ebook date: 1893; matters: Rome; historical past / historical / basic; background / historic / Rome; Juvenile Nonfiction / heritage / historic;

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A History of the Roman Empire from its Foundation to the Death of Marcus Aurelius

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29 the bench of the tribunes of the people. (2) He had the right of which he often practised against decrees of the His person Senate. (3) He possessed the tribunician coercitio. intercession, was inviolable; and not only un injury, but any indignity in act speech offered to him was punishable. (4) He had also the right to interfere for the prevention of abuses, and to protect the or (5) It is possible that his power to initiate legislation partly come under this head. Besides these powers springing from the tribunician potestas, the oppressed.

Thus it might have been regarded as a second cognomen ; and the younger Caesar claimed it as part of title his father's name, and, to make instead of his own pramomen this clear, adopted it as a pramomen Grains. All the agnate descendants of the dictator bore the name Ca3sar, which was a cognomen of the Julian gens. But when the house of the Julian Csesars came to an end on the death of the Emperor Gains, his successor Claudius assumed the cognomen Ctesar, and this Thus Csesar came example was followed by subsequent dynasties.

Here the Emperor discharged duties called the transvectio revived it before the time of Sulla was assisted by three (5) Organisation. He bad been discharged by the censors. or ten semitors appointed for the purpose. The equestrian order was divided into number, each of which was commanded by one of the The seviri were nominated seviri equitum Romanorum (i'Xop^oi). They by the Emperor, and changed annually like the magistrates. were obliged to exhibit games (ludi sevirales) every year. It is to be observed that the knights were not organised or treated as a They had no machinery for political body, like the senate.

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